News Releases


Peru

 

Twenty-one species listed under Convention on Migratory Species Quito, Ecuador. November 9, 2014. Conservationists are rejoicing at the listing of 21 species of sharks and rays under the Appendices of the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS), made official today in the final plenary session of the Conference of Parties (CoP). With these listings, member countries agreed to grant strict protection to the reef manta, the nine devil rays, and the five sawfishes, and committed to work internation...
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Flushing, N.Y. – June 16, 2014 -- Bouba, a young Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus), goes for a swim at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Queens Zoo. Bouba is a 2–year-old male that made his debut at the Queens Zoo in the fall. He shares a habitat with a female Andean bear named Spangles. The Andean bear is the only bear species endemic to South America. It is native to Andean lowlands in Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia, and Argentina. The species is classified as “Vulnerable” by th...
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Four new pelicans make an awe inspiring addition to the zoo’s open-air aviary Bronx, NY – April 16, 2014 – Four Peruvian pelicans have been added to the Russell B. Aitken Sea Bird Colony at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo. Peruvian pelicans (Pelecanus thagus) were once considered a subspecies of the brown pelican, but are now classified as a distinct species. The white markings on their head and neck are more abundant than on the brown pelican, creating a beautiful pattern in the p...
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Andean bears are the only South American bear species Populations are declining due to habitat loss and hunting B-Roll Video Download HD Andean Bear at Queens Zoo b-roll.mov Interview With Queens Zoo Director Scott Silver www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFfI8WU5CXI Flushing, N.Y. – Nov. 14, 2013 - The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Queens Zoo is home to a new Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus), the only bear species endemic to South America. The Andean bear is native to Andean lowlands in Venezuela, ...
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WCS stop-action images reveal rare bear species in Bolivian park attempting to destroy hidden cameras.Watch videoWCS’s studies bears and other wildlife in the Greater Madidi Tambopata Landscape – one of the world’s most wildlife-rich regionsNEW YORK (October 22, 2013) — A series of camera-trap images released by the Wildlife Conservation Society today shows rare Andean bears acting like angry Hollywood celebrities – at least when it comes to having their picture taken.The stop-action images rev...
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Prize Officials Encourage People to Take Action as More Species are at Risk of Extinction INDIANAPOLIS — Thirty-nine conservationists who have dedicated their lives to saving the Earth’s endangered species have been nominated to receive the biennial Indianapolis Prize, the world’s leading award for animal conservation. The winner of the Prize will receive an unrestricted $250,000 cash award and the Lilly Medal. Five other finalists will each receive $10,000. The nominees’ work spans the globe...
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Why are so many whales dying in Argentine Patagonia? The southern right whales that use Península Valdés, Argentina as a nursery ground have suffered the largest mortality event ever recorded for the species in the world. At least 605 right whales have died along the Argentine coast since 2003, including 538 newborn calves. One hundred and thirteen calves died in 2012 alone. The Southern Right Whale Health Monitoring Program is working with scientists worldwide to determine why the whales a...
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WCS works with Ecuadorian communities to promote financial and environmental sustainability in the country's Yasuní National Park. Writing for National Geographic NewsWatch, Galo Zapata, WCS's Ecology and Wildlife Management Coordinator for Ecuador, underscores the need for collaborative conservation as economic developments threaten previously untouched wild places.  

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Paradise Found for Latin America’s Largest Land Mammal WCS documents at least 14,500 lowland tapirs thriving in Peru and Bolivia’s Madidi-Tambopata Landscape Weighing over 650 pounds, lowland tapirs are threatened by over-hunting and habitat loss NEW YORK (January 22, 2012) —Wildlife Conservation Society scientists have documented a thriving population of lowland tapirs – the strange forest and grassland-dwelling herbivore with the trunk-like snout – living in a network of remote nat...
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WCS conservationists have scoured the Peru-Bolivia border for signs of lowland tapirs—large herbivores that possess distinctive markings and snouts. After 12 years of research, they’re able to report that these animals are thriving within five national parks.
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