WCS Newsroom

News Releases

WCS News Releases

Entries for August 2013

Prize Officials Encourage People to Take Action as More Species are at Risk of Extinction INDIANAPOLIS — Thirty-nine conservationists who have dedicated their lives to saving the Earth’s endangered species have been nominated to receive the biennial Indianapolis Prize, the world’s leading award for animal conservation. The winner of the Prize will receive an unrestricted $250,000 cash award and the Lilly Medal. Five other finalists will each receive $10,000. The nominees’ work spans the globe...

Read the story


New York, N.Y. – Aug. 28, 2013 - Gus, the much-celebrated polar bear at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Central Park Zoo, has died. He was 27 years old.Gus was euthanized yesterday while under anesthesia for a medical procedure conducted by WCS veterinarians. Gus had been exhibiting abnormal feeding behavior with low appetite and difficulty chewing and swallowing his food. During the procedure, veterinarians determined Gus had a large, inoperable tumor in his thyroid region. A necropsy wi...

Read the story


Cub is on exhibit at Himalayan HighlandsLeo’s rescue result of partnership between Pakistan and U.S. GovernmentsCub is genetically important to zoo populationSee the video >>Bronx, N.Y. — August 27, 2013 — The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo is debuting a snow leopard cub sired by Leo – the snow leopard which became famous when he was rescued as an young orphaned cub after being found in the high mountains of northern Pakistan. Leo has been serving as an ambassador for Pakistan...

Read the story


A famous snow leopard produces his first offspring at the Bronx Zoo. The rambunctious cub serves as living proof of the positive influence wildlife conservation can have in the world of diplomacy. 

Read the story


Their name makes them sound tough, but Eastern hellbenders are in need of protection in New York State. The salamanders are facing population decline due to habitat destruction, disease, and pollution.

Read the story

Categories: Species

WCS-led study examines overlooked role fruit-eating crocodilians may play in forest regeneration Berries, legumes, nuts, and grains consumed by crocs and alligators New York, N.Y. — August 21, 2013 — It turns out that alligators do not live on meat alone. Neither do Nile crocodiles. A new study led by the Wildlife Conservation Society says that the American alligator and a dozen other crocodile species enjoy an occasional taste of fruit along with their normal meat-heavy diets of mammals, birds...

Read the story

Categories: Species

Bronx Zoo collaborates with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and Buffalo Zoo to save one of the largest salamander species in the world WCS helps re-establish Eastern hellbenders to New York State Watch an underwater video of the release >>Bronx, N.Y. — August 21, 2013 — The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo is working to save the Eastern hellbender, one of the world’s largest species of salamander, and has re-introduced 38 animals into streams in western Ne...

Read the story


In a blog post following her recent trip to Tanzania’s Tarangire National Park, where she observed elephants and met with WCS staff, Chelsea Clinton writes on the urgency of ending the poaching crisis.

Read the story


A new study shows that Blakiston's fish owls are a clear indicator of the health of the forests, rivers, and salmon populations in Russia’s Far East.

Read the story


Rare Blakiston’s fish owls – and their favorite food – rely on giant old-growth trees for breeding and feeding New York, N.Y. — August 15, 2013 — A study spearheaded by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the University of Minnesota has shown that the world's largest owl – and one of the rarest – is also a key indicator of the health of some of the last great primary forests of Russia's Far East. The study found that Blakiston’s fish owl relies on old-growth forests along streams for...

Read the story

Categories: Asia, China, Species

Page 1 of 3First   Previous   [1]  2  3  Next   Last