WCS Newsroom

News Releases

WCS News Releases

Entries for June 2011

WCS conservationists and their partners announce a plan to protect the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee. Restricted to pockets of forest within the two countries, the subspecies is the world’s rarest chimp.

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A WCS field team finds that bears, wolves, and wild cats have survived in the conflict-plagued eastern province of Nuristan. Their study highlights the need for continued conservation support to protect Afghanistan’s natural heritage.

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New plan will increase long term survival of Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzeeWCS developed plan with government officials, other conservation groups, and scientists NEW YORK (June 27, 2011) – The world’s most endangered subspecies of chimpanzee got a much needed shot in the arm today when government officials, conservation groups, and scientists released an action plan to bolster numbers of this critically endangered great ape. Known as the as the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee, the subspecies, ...

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Bears, Wolves, and Wild Cats Survive Decades of War New report highlights need for continued support from USAID to conserve country’s natural heritage Conservation can help stabilize the region, which can improve U.S. national security NEW YORK (June 27, 2011) – A new survey conducted by WCS scientists, supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), reveals that large ma...

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An archaeological study by a WCS marine researcher in Kenya compares fish communities from modern times with those from the Middle Ages. The scientist finds that the modern fish are overwhelmingly smaller, lower on the food chain, and shorter-lived.

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Categories: Marine, Species

Archeological study by Wildlife Conservation Society finds that sustained overfishing results in fewer long-lived species and top predators NEW YORK (June 23, 2011)—Fish communities in the 21st Century live fast and die young. That’s the main finding of a recent study by researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society who compared fish recently caught in coastal Kenya with the bones of fish contained in ancient Swahili refuse heaps in order to understan...

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Research will better inform land-use planning and development process SARANAC LAKE, NY (June 23, 2011) – The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Adirondack Program (WCS) announced today that the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded two WCS scientists, Dr. Heidi Kretser and Dr. Michale Glennon, a four-year, $350,000.00 grant to study the impacts that exurban development has on wildlife in the Adirondack Park of upstate New York and in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem in southweste...

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Petitions delivered to City Hall today in protest of proposed 53 percent budget cuts as lawmakers enter the final budget negotiations New Yorkers rally behind WCS’s Bronx Zoo and New York Aquarium and cultural organizations in all five boroughs Cultural organizations are economic engines for NYC and cuts could mean elimination of jobs and services Visit wcs.org/cityhall to sign the petit...

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Categories: Inspire

A WCS conservationist maps out a climate change survival plan for species living within Montana’s Crown of the Continent ecosystem.

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