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News Releases

WCS News Releases

Entries for September 2008

Madagascar President Marc Ravalomanana enjoyed a unique opportunity to visit his homeland while he was attending the UN General Assembly in New York. On Sunday, September 21, the President toured Madagascar!, the Wildlife Conservation Society's spectacular new exhibit that opened in June at the Bronx Zoo. The visit included glimpses of lemurs and fossas—fascinating mammals that occur only on that island nation. In addition to touring Madagascar!, President Ravalomanana and WCS staff discussed th...

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Two East African nations agree to safeguard home of endangered chimpanzeesand rare and unusual primates. New York (September 15, 2008) – The Wildlife Conservation Society announced that it has facilitated an agreement between the two nations of Rwanda and Burundi to safeguard the largest remaining block of mountain forest in East Africa.The agreement, which was signed in Huye, Rwanda on September 10th, will help improve conservation in Rwanda’s Nyungwe National Park and Burundi’s Kibira National...

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WCS facilitates an agreement between Rwanda and Burundi to protect the largest mountain forest block in East Africa—home to chimpanzees, owl-faced monkeys, and other endangered primates.

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World-Famous Italian Fountain Springs Eternal! Bronx, N.Y.—September, 2008  – The historic Italian Fountain at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Bronx Zoo has been completely restored. An evening event on Sunday, September 14, celebrated the restoration with a special visit by Daniele Travi, special envoy to the government of Como, Italy and with a performance by Italian-American tenor, Michael Amante.The Italian Fountain, also known as the Rockefeller Fountain, is carved from ...

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The Wildlife Crime Units help intercept the trade in illegal tiger parts on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Ten arrests have been made in three months.

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In Myanmar’s wild lands, camera traps set up by WCS researchers provide glimpses on the lost world of tigers, civets, and other predators.

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Camera traps provide glimpses on ‘Lost World’ of tigers and other predators New York(September 4, 2008)—Using remote camera traps to lift the veil on Myanmar's dense northern wild lands, researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society have painstakingly gathered a bank of valuable data on the country's populations of tigers and other smaller, lesser known carnivores (see photo attachments). These findings will help in the formulation of conservation strategies for the country's wildlife.&nbs...

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WCS’s Wildlife Crime Unit played a key role in arrests

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