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Global Conservation


Joint Study by WCS & Yale Identifies Challenges and Opportunities to Safeguard One of Mesoamerica’s Last Forest Blocks

The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Yale University have created a plan to preserve one of the last intact forest strongholds for the jaguar and other iconic species in Central America: the Moskitia Forest Corridor.

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WCS Celebrates The Leadership of Women in Wildlife Conservation
The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) held its annual gala at Central Park Zoo tonight where 500 guests celebrated the leadership of women in wildlife conservation and WCS’s impact on saving wildlife and wild places across the globe.
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Silverback Gorilla Celebrates 40th Birthday in Congo Rainforest

He’s a father of 20 from nine different mothers. He’s a fierce defender of his family and helped nurse two of his offspring back from leopard attacks. He likes to nap with his feet in the air, and he hums while he eats. Meet Kingo, a wild silverback gorilla who is celebrating his 40th birthday.

 

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New Research in Kenya Finds Sweet Spot for Harvesting Reef Fish
An age-old challenge of determining the right amount of fish to harvest from the sea has finally been overcome with the creation of a new biomass-yield model that captures all the necessary factors for accuracy, according to a new WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) study.  The study titled “Multicriteria estimate of coral reef fishery sustainability” appears online in the journal Fish and Fisheries. Knowing the highest volume of fish that can be taken from coral reefs without ...
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Study in Fiji Finds That Removing Sea Cucumbers Spells Trouble for Shallow Coastal Waters

NEW YORK (June 5, 2018)—The lowly sea cucumber strikes observers as a simple sausage-like creature, one that is far less interesting than brightly colored reef fish or color-changing octopi that share its coastal habitat. The sea cucumber’s unimpressive appearance belies the outsized role these creatures play in converting decomposing organic matter into recyclable nutrients and keeping coastal ecosystems healthy and clean, and overfishing them can have negative impacts on coastal marine environments, according to a new study focusing on a species of sea cucumber called a sandfish in the journal PeerJ.

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GIVE A SIP: WCS Launches Campaign to Support Bill Eliminating Plastic Straws in New York City
NEW YORK (May 23, 2018) – The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) kicked off its Give a Sip campaign today to support a bill introduced by Councilman Rafael Espinal that will eliminate the use of most single-use plastic straws in New York City.
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Two-and-a-Half-Year Identidad Madidi Expedition Ends After Visiting 15 Remote Sites in Bolivia’s Madidi National Park
LA PAZ, BOLIVIA (May 22, 2018) — After a two-and-a-half-year expedition through the world’s most biodiverse protected area, the Identidad Madidi explorers have concluded their epic quest of completing a massive biological survey of Madidi National Park, uncovering more than 120 potentially new species of plants, butterflies and vertebrates in the process, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society).
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Conservation groups applaud House introduction of WILD Act

WASHINGTON (May 18, 2018) – Congressmen Alan Lowenthal (D-CA) and Don Young (R-AK) introduced the Wildlife Innovation and Longevity Driver (WILD) Act, a bipartisan bill which contains several measures that are imperative to conserving wildlife and wild places.

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Shocking Study Shows One Third of World’s Protected Areas Degraded by Human Activities

A shocking study in the journal Science by the University of Queensland, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and University of Northern British Columbia confirms that one third of the world’s protected areas – an astonishing 2.3 million square miles or twice the size of the state of Alaska – are now under intense human pressure including road building, grazing, and urbanization.

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Scientists Discover Balance of Thermal Energy and Low Climate Stress Drive Coral Species Diversity
May 1, 2018 – Marine scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), University of Warwick, and University of Queensland have identified two key factors that create the ideal conditions needed for high species diversity in coral reefs: thermal energy in the form of warm water and low climate stress. 
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