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Gabon

 

A new survey conducted by WCS and partners reveals that, since 2004, poachers have slaughtered 11,000 forest elephants in a Gabonese national park. Until recently, elephant herds were thought to be less impacted by poaching in Gabon than in other parts of Africa.
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WCS scientists confirm Africa’s largest elephant population cut by at least half in ten years Gabon’s Minkebe National Park has been decimated by poachers for ivory trade LIBREVILLE, GABON (February 6, 2013): The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today that a national park, once home to Africa’s largest forest elephant population, has lost a staggering 11,100 individuals due to poaching for the ivory trade. The shocking figures come from Gabon...
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A Statement Issued by Dr. James Deutsch, Executive Director for the Africa Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society NEW YORK (June 28, 2012)—“Gabon becomes the second African country, after Kenya, to completely reject the ivory trade by burning their valuable stockpiles of confiscated and recovered elephant ivory. When Kenya first did this in 1989, it helped lead to an international ban on trade in ivory, and that led to a collapse in the price of ivory and a remarkable rec...
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Efforts include breeding at zoos combined with intensive field conservation work WCS will take direct responsibility for the continued survival of at least half of the 25 most endangered species of turtles and tortoisesWCS working with Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS), the Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA), Turtle Conservancy (TC), and the Asian Turtle Program (ATP) in global effort NEW YORK (April 11, 2012) – The Wildlife Conservation Society announced today a new strategy that draws on all of th...
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New study finds 87 marine mammal species consumed by people in 114 countries New York (January 24, 2012)—The fate of the world’s great whale species commands global attention as a result of heated debate between pro and anti-whaling advocates, but the fate of smaller marine mammals is less understood, specifically because the deliberate and accidental harvesting of dolphins, porpoises, manatees and other warm-blooded aquatic denizens is rarely studied or monitored. To shed more light on the i...
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Trained observers will collect data for more effective fisheries and marine ecosystem management NEW YORK (January 4, 2012)—The Wildlife Conservation Society recently collaborated with Gabon’s Department of Fisheries, the Gabon Sea Turtle Partnership, Defra’s Darwin Initiative at the University of Exeter (UK), the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of the USA (NOAA) to organize a land-mark fisheries observer training course for Central Afri...
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In the rainforests of Central Africa, hunters are finding their way into once inaccessible terrain, spelling disaster for forest elephants.
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Tropical forests with multiple access points for hunters have fewer elephants  NEW YORK (August 16, 2011)—The survival of the forest elephants of Central Africa depends on limiting access to rain forests via roads, settlements, and other entry points to otherwise inaccessible habitat, according to a new study by the Wildlife Conservation Society and other partnersThe study says that entry points to the rain forests facilitated by roads, rivers, or oth...
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Olive ridley sea turtles nest on the beaches Gabon but spend most of their lives in waters off the Republic of Congo. To protect them, WCS recommends the first international marine park off Africa’s western coast.
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Olive ridley sea turtles nest in Gabon but spend most of their time in waters off Republic of Congo To protect these transnational sea turtles, scientists from Wildlife Conservation Society and others recommended the region’s first international marine park NEW YORK (May 11, 2011)— Satellite tracking of olive ridley sea turtles off the coast of Central Africa has revealed that existing protected areas may be inadequate to safeguard turtle...
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