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NEW YORK —After 15 years of research in the waters of the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans, scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, and an international coalition of organizations have unveiled the largest genetic study of humpback whale populations ever conducted in the Southern Hemisphere. By analyzing DNA samples from more than 1,500 whales, researchers can now peer into the population dynamics and relatedness of Southern Hemi...
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Good management means more fish in the sea, according to a new study. Efforts to curb overfishing have begun to succeed, and offer hope that fish stocks can rebuild if given a chance.
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WCSs work in Kenya takes part of global assessment showing improvement in some fisheries  Good management means more fish in the sea, research says NEW YORK – A groundbreaking new study by the Wildlife Conservation Society and an international team of scientists brings surprising good news for some of the world’s fisheries: efforts to curb overfishing have begun to succeed giving hope that fish stocks can rebui...
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WCS scientists track a new subspecies of tamarin in an isolated region of the upper Amazon. Despite the remoteness of its habitat, the monkey is threatened by development in the region.
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New sub-species emerges within isolated region in upper Amazon Proposed dams and other regional development threaten the newly found tamarin  New York (July 7, 2009) -- The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today the discovery of a new monkey in a remote region of the Amazon in Brazil. The monkey is related to saddleback tamarins, which include several species of monkeys known for their distinctively marked backs. The newly describe...
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WCS announces a new way to count tigers, based on a study that shows that fecal DNA sampling provides extremely accurate estimates of the big cats’ populations.
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New study shows that fecal DNA sampling provides extremely accurate estimates of tiger populations New technique is a powerful tool to help save critically endangered big cats NEW YORK (JUNE 18, 2009) – The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today a major breakthrough in the science of saving tigers: high-tech DNA fecal sampling. According to the study, researchers will be able to accurately count and assess tiger populations by identifying individual animals from the uniq...
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Brooklyn, NY – The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), which conducts conservation projects throughout the world’s oceans, proudly supports World Oceans Day on June 8th, an event now officially recognized by the United Nations. World Oceans Day, organized by the Ocean Project with support from WCS and other groups, comes as a sweeping new national survey reveals that Americans are concerned about the health of the ocean and are ready to take personal action to make a difference. The Wildlife ...
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It’s Not Only Fish That Need Coral Reefs WASHINGTON (MAY 20, 2009) The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) held a Congressional policy briefing today on Capitol Hill highlighting the need for better policies to protect the world’s coral reefs in the face of climate change. Featured speakers included WCS President and CEO Dr. Steven E. Sanderson, WCS Director of Marine Conservation Dr. Caleb McClennen, and WCS Senior Conservation Zoologist Dr. Tim McClanahan. Honorary hosts at the brief...
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Scientists discover the world’s largest nesting population of leatherback sea turtles on the beaches of Gabon. The finding offers new hope for the future of this endangered species.
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