News Releases


Ecuador

 

WCS stop-action images reveal rare bear species in Bolivian park attempting to destroy hidden cameras.Watch videoWCS’s studies bears and other wildlife in the Greater Madidi Tambopata Landscape – one of the world’s most wildlife-rich regionsNEW YORK (October 22, 2013) — A series of camera-trap images released by the Wildlife Conservation Society today shows rare Andean bears acting like angry Hollywood celebrities – at least when it comes to having their picture taken.The stop-action images rev...
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Proposals to protect five species of sharks, freshwater sawfish, and two manta ray species have been accepted by CITES. These protections are critical to ensuring that international trade does not threaten the survival of commercially valuable shark and ray species.
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Five commercially valuable shark species, manta rays & freshwater sawfish listed  The following statement was issued today by WCS President and CEO Cristian Samper: The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) today celebrates the decision by an historic, broad group of nations from around the world to list five new sharks, freshwater sawfish, and two manta ray species for protection by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). This vote is a fi...
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WCS works with Ecuadorian communities to promote financial and environmental sustainability in the country's Yasuní National Park. Writing for National Geographic NewsWatch, Galo Zapata, WCS's Ecology and Wildlife Management Coordinator for Ecuador, underscores the need for collaborative conservation as economic developments threaten previously untouched wild places.  

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Wildlife Conservation Society joins call on governments to list species of sharks and rays on CITES NEW YORK (March 6, 2013)—Government delegates to the 16th meeting of the 178 member States of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) convening in Bangkok, Thailand this week can help conserve some of the world’s most threatened sharks and rays—ancient, cartilaginous fish species that are under severe pressure globally from over-fishing –...
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Efforts include breeding at zoos combined with intensive field conservation work WCS will take direct responsibility for the continued survival of at least half of the 25 most endangered species of turtles and tortoisesWCS working with Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS), the Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA), Turtle Conservancy (TC), and the Asian Turtle Program (ATP) in global effort NEW YORK (April 11, 2012) – The Wildlife Conservation Society announced today a new strategy that draws on all of th...
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Ceremony welcomes 35 children from 14 countries NEW YORK — May 12, 2011 – U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) administered the Oath of Allegiance to 35 children at a special naturalization ceremony at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Bronx Zoo on Monday, May 9. USCIS New York District Director Andrea Quarantillo administered the oath to the new citizens who ranged in age from 20 months to 17 years old. John Calvelli, WCS Executive Vice President of Public Affairs,...
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Photo Credit: Judith Wolfe © Wildlife Conservation Society See the video at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijhYVDNMe7k Three young, playful mountain coatimundi have a new home in the Tropic Zone exhibit at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Central Park Zoo.  Mountain coatis live in large groups in the mountains of Venezuela, Colombia, and Ecuador. They have long, flexible noses for sniffing and rooting out food from fallen leaves in the forest and they hold their striped tails up in the ...
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A WCS study reveals that a road constructed by an oil company through Ecuador’s Yasuni National Park became a wildlife market pipeline.
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WCS study reveals that road constructed for oil extraction in National Park becomes a wildlife market pipeline NEW YORK (September 10, 2009)—What harm can a simple road do in a pristine place such as Ecuador’s Yasuni National Park, home to peccaries, tapirs, monkeys and myriad other wildlife species? A great deal, it turns out. Specifically, it can turn subsistence communities into commercial hunting camps that empty rainforests of their wildlife, researchers from the Wildlife Conservation ...
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