News Releases


Peru

 

Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Could Include Provisions that Help Curb Wildlife Trafficking in Asia Washington, D.C. – December 7, 2012 – In a letter to U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk, the Wildlife Conservation Society urged the United States government to maintain its commitment to environmental provisions to stop illegal wildlife trade during ongoing trade talks with countries in Southeast Asia. The United States has proposed a binding and enforceable conservation chapter for...
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The giant leaf frog is one resident of Peru’s Bahuaja Sonene National Park, where 50 reptiles and amphibian species, along with hundreds of other undocumented birds, mammals, insects, and plants were recently found during an extensive survey.
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365 species previously undocumented in the area are found thriving in protected sanctuary NEW YORK (February 2, 2012) – The Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) Peru program announced today the discovery of 365 species previously undocumented in Bahuaja Sonene National Park (BSNP) in southeastern Peru. Fifteen researchers participated in the inventory focusing on plant life, insects, birds, mammals, and reptiles. The discovery included: thirty undocumented bird species, including the black-and-...
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In a recent study conducted in Bolivia’s Madidi National Park, WCS researchers have identified a record number of jaguars through a digital camera trap survey.
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New digital cameras capture images of 19 individual jaguars i n Madidi National Park NEW YORK (October 19, 2011) – In a new camera trap survey in the world’s most biologically diverse landscape, researchers for the Wildlife Conservation Society have identified more individual jaguars than ever before. Using technology first adapted to identify tigers by stripe patterns, WCS conservationists have identified 19 individual jaguars by spot patterns in the rainforests o...
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WCS researchers see drops in wildlife numbers as climate change causes Amazonian rivers to run low.
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Low water levels threaten river dolphins, fish species, and macaws NEW YORK (November 12, 2010) – A wide range of wildlife – from pink river dolphins to macaws – are being adversely affected by the worst drought on record gripping the Peruvian Amazon, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), which is monitoring Peru’s Samiria River.   WCS researchers are working with local communities in the 7,700-square-mile Pacaya Samiria National Reserve to observe how changes in water...
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WCS President and CEO Dr. Steven E. Sanderson, Appearing in Americas Quarterly: Does the 21st Century Belong to Asia or Latin America?Latin America Positioned to Lead On Climate Change and Sustainable Policies Sanderson Suggests a Three-Point Conservation Agenda for Latin America as a prelude to UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen in December (BRONX, NEW YORK, October 15, 2009) In the article “Growing Green,” appearing in the fall issue of the jour...
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WCS scientists track a new subspecies of tamarin in an isolated region of the upper Amazon. Despite the remoteness of its habitat, the monkey is threatened by development in the region.
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New sub-species emerges within isolated region in upper Amazon Proposed dams and other regional development threaten the newly found tamarin  New York (July 7, 2009) -- The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today the discovery of a new monkey in a remote region of the Amazon in Brazil. The monkey is related to saddleback tamarins, which include several species of monkeys known for their distinctively marked backs. The newly describe...
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