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Climate Change


In a new study, researchers show that wild yak mothers are found on higher ground than their male counterparts. The scientists expect this is an adaptive way to avoid predators and to access more nutritious food.
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New Study Says Females use more mountainous terrain than males NEW YORK (June 16, 2014) – A new study led by the Wildlife Conservation Society says that in wild yak societies, it’s the mothers that are the real climbers. The study found that mothers with young are on steeper terrain and slightly higher elevation than either males or females without young. The authors of the study expect that this strategy is an adaptive way to avoid predators and to access more nutritious food. Wild ya...
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Birders of all experience levels welcome Chat with WCS bird experts to learn about migratory birds, conservation, and other species in the zoo The Bronx Zoo Birdathon includes early access to the zoo and all-day admission Saturday, May 17Experienced bird-watchers start at 7am; Families and novice bird-watchers start at 8:30 Birdathon registration is now open:www.bronxzoo.com Bronx, NY – May 6, 2014 – The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo will host the first ever “Bronx Zoo Birdathon” on ...
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See dozens of wild bird species at the height of the migration seasonBirders of all experience levels welcomeChat with WCS bird experts to learn about migratory birds, conservation, and other species in the zooThe Bronx Zoo Birdathon includes early access to the zoo and all-day admissionSaturday, May 17Experienced bird-watchers start at 7am; Families and novice bird-watchers start at 8:30Birdathon registration is now open: www.bronxzoo.comBronx, NY – May 6, 2014 – The Wildlife Conservation Socie...
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20-year study finds large decrease in green turtle catch rates Study authors recommend limits on artisanal fishingNew York (April 16th, 2014)—A 20-year assessment of Nicaragua’s legal, artisanal green sea turtle fishery has uncovered a stark reality: greatly reduced overall catch rates of turtles in what may have become an unsustainable take, according to conservation scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society and University of Florida. During the research period, conservation scientists...
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Four new pelicans make an awe inspiring addition to the zoo’s open-air aviary Bronx, NY – April 16, 2014 – Four Peruvian pelicans have been added to the Russell B. Aitken Sea Bird Colony at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo. Peruvian pelicans (Pelecanus thagus) were once considered a subspecies of the brown pelican, but are now classified as a distinct species. The white markings on their head and neck are more abundant than on the brown pelican, creating a beautiful pattern in the p...
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Yearling and adult muskoxen staring back at Dr. Joel Berger on Wrangel Island in the Russian Arctic.
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SARANAC LAKE (April 10, 2014) – A new study from the Wildlife Conservation Society finds that several iconic Adirondack birds are in trouble, with declines driven by the size of their wetland habitats, how connected these wetlands are to one another, and how near they are to human infrastructure.The Adirondack Park represents the southern range extent for several species of boreal forest birds in eastern North America. Like any species at the edge of its range, they face challenges in this env...
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Dr. Joel Berger of WCS and the University of Montana taking part in a landmark U.S.–Russian bilateral conservation expedition on Wrangel Island off the coast of northeastern Siberia Berger and his Russian colleagues braving wind-chills down to –70°F to gather information on the impacts of climate change on the Arctic’s largest land mammal—the muskoxen(April 9, 2014) — Dr. Joel Berger, Senior Scientist with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s North America Program and John J. Craighead Chair in ...
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Study in Journal Science Says: fences can cause “ecological meltdown” of wildlife NEW YORK (3 April 2014) - Wildlife fences are constructed for a variety of reasons including to prevent the spread of diseases, protect wildlife from poachers, and to help manage small populations of threatened species. Human–wildlife conflict is another common reason for building fences: Wildlife can damage valuable livestock, crops, or infrastructure, some species carry diseases of agricultural concern, and a few...
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