News Releases


Mesoamerica and Western Caribbean


With help from WCS, the Bolivian Park Service released a new compendium documenting the abundant plant and wildlife found within Madidi National Park. The natural haven houses more than 200 mammal species, 11 percent of the world’s birds, and the vibrant parrot snake, photographed as it slithers through the trees.
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During the 2012 IUCN World Conservation Congress in Jeju, Korea, WCS urges government entities to protect sharks and rays from overfishing. WCS advocates improved management of fisheries, limits on catches of certain species, and increased CITES protections.
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Wildlife Conservation Society and partners call for regulation of international trade in sharks and rays  JEJU, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, September 4, 2012—The Wildlife Conservation Society and over 35 government agency and NGO partners participating in IUCN’s World Conservation Congress this week are urging the world’s governments to take urgent steps to save the world’s sharks and rays from the relentless pressure of over-fishing for international trade.  WC...
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WCS applauds efforts of Patagonian partners in sustainability NEW YORK (August 27, 2012)—It’s official: Patagonian “green” cashmere has been certified as “Wildlife Friendly,” according to the Wildlife Conservation Society, supporter of a group of eco-minded cashmere producers living in Argentina’s Patagonian Steppe region. The new certification—granted by the Wildlife Friendly Enterprise Network—represents a victory for the Grupo Costa del Rio Colorado, a cooperative that works to minimiz...
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View the video at:http://youtu.be/Q2lDV0MMrcw Bronx, NY – Aug. 15, 2012 – ATTACHED PHOTO AND VIDEO: A Caribbean flamingo hatchling takes its first steps at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo. The chick is helped to its feet by its mother and stands on a nest mound in the pond outside of the zoo’s Aquatic Birds exhibit. Flamingos are hatched with white downy plumage but develop trademark pink coloration from pigments in the algae, crustaceans, and oth...
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Although conservationists have long known that turtles return to their natal beaches to lay eggs, direct evidence of these pilgrimages is scant. With sea turtles more imperiled than ever, conservationists can’t help but delight in success stories like this one.
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This year brings perfect flamingo breeding conditions to Inagua National Park Bronx, NY – July 16, 2012 – This year has been a bumper crop for Caribbean flamingos in Inagua National Park in the Bahamas. The Wildlife Conservation Society’s Bronx Zoo, with the help of partner organizations, led a flamingo banding program in June to facilitate the long-term monitoring of movements across the species’ range. Led by Dr. Nancy Clum, Curator of Ornithology at the Bronx Zoo, the ...
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It’s a banner year for Caribbean flamingos in Inagua National Park, Bahamas. In June, WCS veterinarians and Bronx Zoo bird experts joined a crew of international researchers to band the juvenile birds, and check up on their health.
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New Book from the Wildlife Conservation Society illustrates how conservation-planning is evolving to prepare for climate change BOZEMAN, MT (June 14, 2012) –A landmark book released by the Wildlife Conservation Society through Island Press shows that people in diverse environments around the world are moving from climate science to conservation action to ensure their natural systems, wildlife and livelihoods can withstand the pressures of global warming. Climate and Conservation offers a...
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The first satellite tag study for the world’s largest ray, conducted by researchers from WCS, the University of Exeter, and the Mexican government, reveals its habits and hidden journeys.
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