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Fiji

 

Strong Sharing Networks Can Help Communities Rebound From Crises
Of the top five countries in the world most at risk to disasters, three are Pacific Island nations. Yet time and time again, Pacific Islanders exhibit marked abilities to quickly recover. Part of the reason may be due to strong social networks that help to distribute resources to those most in need, say marine scientists from the University of Hawaiʿi, National Geographic Society and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) in a new study.
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Integrating Social and Ecological Science  For Effective Coral Reef Conservation
While many conservation plans focus on only environmental indicators for success, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)’s coral reef program is trying a relatively new approach: focusing on both social and ecological processes and outcomes to ensure a long-term future for coral reef systems, according to a newly published study.
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Besides Hot Water, Coral Bleaching Also About Location, Location, Location
As conservationists grapple with unprecedented levels of coral reef bleaching in the world’s warming oceans, scientists in the Indian and Pacific Oceans used the most recent El Nino of 2016 (the warmest year on record) to evaluate the role of excess heat as the leading driver of coral bleaching.
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A NEW HOPE FOR CORAL REEFS: Largest-Ever Study of Coral Communities Unlocks Global Solution to Save Reefs
he largest study ever conducted of its kind has identified where and how to save coral reef communities in the Indo-Pacific, according to an international group of scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other conservation NGOs, government agencies, and universities. The study outlines three viable strategies that can be quickly enacted to help save coral reefs that are threatened by climate change and human impacts.  
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Fisheries Outcomes Maximized Through Traditional Practice
The study’s authors—researchers from the California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly), WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Swansea University, the University of Rhode Island (URI) and other groups—have found that fishing grounds with areas that are closed to fisheries but are periodically harvested are better than fishing grounds with permanent, no-take marine protected areas (MPAs).
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Study Finds Tropical Cyclone Winston Damaged Fisheries as Well as Homes in Fiji
A newly published study by WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) has found that impacts of Tropical Cyclone Winston on the coastal communities of Fiji went beyond the immediate loss of lives and infrastructure. The cyclone also had a lingering effect on the fisheries many communities depend on, particularly on the availability of commercially important crustaceans. 
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Fiji's Ministry of Fisheries teamed up with leading researchers to help fishers and fish sellers earn more money from grouper (kawakawa) and coral trout (donu) species once the fisheries begin to recover following the recent grouper seasonal protection.
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WCS Commits to Protecting Coral Reefs At Our Ocean Conference in Bali, Indonesia
WCS President and CEO Dr. Cristián Samper issued the following statement on the announcement of $185 million in new support from Michael Bloomberg and Ray Dalio’s OceanX to increase ocean exploration and protection at the Our Ocean Conference in Bali, Indonesia.
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Scientists in Fiji Examine How Forest Conservation Helps Coral Reefs

Researchers from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa), WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), and other groups are discovering how forest conservation in Fiji can minimize the impact of human activities on coral reefs and their fish populations.


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Study in Fiji Finds That Removing Sea Cucumbers Spells Trouble for Shallow Coastal Waters

NEW YORK (June 5, 2018)—The lowly sea cucumber strikes observers as a simple sausage-like creature, one that is far less interesting than brightly colored reef fish or color-changing octopi that share its coastal habitat. The sea cucumber’s unimpressive appearance belies the outsized role these creatures play in converting decomposing organic matter into recyclable nutrients and keeping coastal ecosystems healthy and clean, and overfishing them can have negative impacts on coastal marine environments, according to a new study focusing on a species of sea cucumber called a sandfish in the journal PeerJ.

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