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NEW YORK (January 13, 2010)—Researchers for the Wildlife Conservation Society have discovered for the first time the breeding area of the large-billed reed warbler—dubbed in 2007 as “the world’s least known bird species”—in the remote and rugged Wakhan Corridor of the Pamir Mountains of north-eastern Afghanistan. Using a combination of astute field observations, museum specimens, DNA sequencing, and the first known audio recording of the species, researchers verified the discovery by capturing...
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Known by seafood fans as one of the most sustainable options on the dinner menu, tilapia farmed in Fiji is gaining a new reputation as an invasive species that’s threatening the islands’ native fish.
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“Limestone leaf warbler” has a unique call, setting it apart from other warblersWarbler was found in limestone region in Laos, home to treasure trove of new species NEW YORK – (December 21, 2009) A diminutive, colorful bird living in the rocky forests of Laos and Vietnam has been discovered by a team of scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, Lao PDR Department of Forestry, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Swedish Museum of Natural History, BirdLife ...
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WCS helps discover the limestone leaf warbler, a small yellow bird with a distinctive call, in Laos. The bird’s home in the Southeast Asian country’s limestone region has become known as a treasure trove of new species.

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Report Highlights Impacts of Deforestation & Climate Change NEW YORK (December 7, 2009) —The Wildlife Conservation Society today released a list of animals facing new impacts by climate change, some in strange and unexpected ways. In a new report titled “Species Feeling the Heat: Connecting Deforestation and Climate Change,” the Wildlife Conservation Society profiles more than a dozen animal species and groups that are facing threats...
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A WCS report, “Species Feeling the Heat: Connecting Deforestation and Climate Change,” highlights the impacts of deforestation and climate change on species around the globe.
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Short desc: Fewer prey animals, more poachers, and extreme weather events have caused tiger numbers to plummet in the Russian Far East.
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Dr. Peter Clyne is an Assistant Director in the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Asia Program, specializing in conservation in the southern part of the continent. We talked to him about his interest in conservation and what he considers to be the most important issues in conservation today.
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Poaching, reductions in prey, and unusual weather all cited as factorsBetter law enforcement, habitat improvements, and improved protected areas needed to reverse decline NEW YORK (November 24, 2009) -- The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today a report revealing that the last remaining population of Siberian tigers has likely declined significantly due to the rising tide of poaching and habitat loss. WCS says the report will help inform Russian officials ...
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New York, NY, Nov. 4, 2009– The Central Park Zoo is pleased to announce the arrival of four adorable mini Nubian goats. Ace, the only male, along with Angel, Monique and Spirit, now live in the zoo’s Tisch Children’s Zoo alongside pygmy goats and the zoo’s famous full-sized Nubian, Newman. All hail from upstate New York. Mini Nubians are a cross between Nigerian dwarf and full-sized Nubian goats. The minis look very similar to the larger breed, with long floppy ears and coats that can be many di...
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