News Releases


Tanzania

 

Spectacularly colored Matilda’s horned viper is discovered by WCS and Museo delle Scienze of Trento, Italy New snake is restricted to remote forest in southwest Tanzania NEW YORK (January 9, 2012) -- The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced the discovery of a spectacularly colored snake from a remote area of Tanzania in East Africa. The striking black-and-yellow snake is called Matilda’s horned viper. It measures 2.1 feet (60 centimeters) and has horn-lik...
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WCS and the Museo delle Scienze of Trento, Italy discover a spectacularly colored new snake. Named Matilda’s horned viper, the snake is restricted to remote forest in southwest Tanzania.
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New nation’s independence on July 9th represents hope for the world’s second largest terrestrial migration With USAID support, WCS is working with South Sudan’s government on protected area management and land-use planning NEW YORK (July 8, 2011) – As South Sudan officially breaks away to form a new nation on July 9, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) emphasizes that the vast wildlife and habitat resources of...
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A team of conservationists has released three adult cheetahs, rescued from the hands of an illegal wildlife trader, into Tarangire National Park in Tanzania.
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One of three rescued adult cheetahs released last week in Tarangire National Park in Tanzania. The release was conducted by a team of conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, Zoological Society of London (ZSL), and Frankfurt Zoological Society (FZS) working with the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute (TAWIRI) and the Tanzania Wildlife Division.  The cheetahs were confiscated from an illegal wildlife trader in the Tanzanian city of Arusha. Each cheetah was fitted with a satellit...
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‘Invisible’ barriers within the western Indian Ocean are keeping populations of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins from intermingling. New research advises conservation plans to take environmental conditions such as currents into consideration.
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Study by Wildlife Conservation Society, AMNH, on dolphins finds invisible oceanographic factors that keep populations separate NEW YORK (March 24, 2011)—Conservationists from the Wildlife Conservation Society, the American Museum of Natural History, and other conservation and research groups have discovered that groups of dolphins in the western Indian Ocean do not mix freely with one another. In fact, dolphin populations are kept separate by currents and other unseen factors. S...
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Tiny toads, extinct in the wild, now reside in propagation center in Dar es Salaam after being bred by Toledo Zoo and Bronx Zoo A Great Partnership Saves the Toads: Tanzanian government, Bronx Zoo, The Toledo Zoo, and World Bank Toads destined to be returned to their habitat DAR ES SALAAM (August 17, 2010) – In a bold effort to save one of the world’s rarest amphibians from extinction, one hundred Kihansi spray toads have been flown home to Tanzania after being painstakingly reared...
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Born and bred in American zoos, 100 highly endangered Kihansi spray toads take a flight to Tanzania to repopulate their home turf. The species was recently listed as "extinct in the wild," but scientists, zoo staff, and government officials hope to turn its fate around.

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WCS and IUCN launch an international, decade-long action plan to protect eastern chimpanzees by safeguarding 16 crucial areas where their populations number around 48,000 individuals.
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