News Releases


Tanzania

 

Successful reef management coupled with geophysical factors produces hearty corals off East Africa coast NEW YORK (April 23, 2009) – The Wildlife Conservation Society announced today a study showing that some coral reefs off East Africa are unusually resilient to climate change due to improved fisheries management and a combination of geophysical factors. WCS announced the results of the study at the International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI), which is meeting this week in Phuket, Thailand. The ...
Full Article
In the face of warming ocean waters due to climate change, some coral reefs off East Africa are demonstrating unusual resiliency. A WCS study shows that successful fisheries management is key.
Full Article
Photographic confirmation of fleet-footed big cats a first for that country NEW YORK (February 23, 2009)—A Wildlife Conservation Society-supported survey of the Sahara has captured the first camera-trap photographs of the critically endangered Saharan cheetah in Algeria. The survey was conducted by researchers from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL), the Office du Parc National de l’Ahaggar (OPNA), and the Université de Béjaïa, with support from WCS and Panthera. The photographs were taken a...
Full Article
Two East African nations agree to safeguard home of endangered chimpanzeesand rare and unusual primates. New York (September 15, 2008) – The Wildlife Conservation Society announced that it has facilitated an agreement between the two nations of Rwanda and Burundi to safeguard the largest remaining block of mountain forest in East Africa.The agreement, which was signed in Huye, Rwanda on September 10th, will help improve conservation in Rwanda’s Nyungwe National Park and Burundi’s Kibira National...
Full Article
WCS facilitates an agreement between Rwanda and Burundi to protect the largest mountain forest block in East Africa—home to chimpanzees, owl-faced monkeys, and other endangered primates.
Full Article
A WCS study suggests that the experience of matriarchs may help herds survive in the age of climate change, when animals may have to contend with increasing drought
Full Article
Recent study suggests experience of old matriarchs may help herds survive in age of climate changeNEW YORK (August 11, 2008)—A recent study by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) suggests that old female elephants—and perhaps their memories of distant, life-sustaining sources of food and water—may be the key to survival during the worst of times.In particular, experienced elephant matriarchs seem to give their family groups an edge in the struggle for sur...
Full Article
Poaching and illegal logging have driven Tanzania’s kipunji monkey, discovered just three years ago, to the brink of extinction in its tiny forest home.
Full Article
Study says Africa’s “kipunji” hovers at 1,100 individuals; Poaching, illegal logging threatens remaining populationNEW YORK (JULY 28, 2008) – Just three years after it was discovered, a new species of monkey is threatened with extinction according to the Wildlife Conservation Society, which recently published the first-ever census of the endangered primate. Known as the “kipunji,” the large, forest-dwelling primate hovers at 1,117 individuals, according to a study released in the July issue of t...
Full Article
Brooklyn, NY, June 30, 2008 – The Wildlife Conservation Society’s (WCS) education initiative, Teens for Planet Earth, is pleased to announce the winners of its 2008 Service Awards, which recognize teens around the world for service-learning projects that demonstrate their commitment to the environment.  Winners of the Gold Service Awards include: Kubiti Teak Plantation Group, Jasikam, Ghana; Soldiers of the Environment, Mbeya, Tanzania; Southern Idaho Squirrel Squad, Idaho, USA; and Team B....
Full Article
Page 9 of 9First   Previous   4  5  6  7  8  [9]  Next   Last   

© 2020 Wildlife Conservation Society

WCS, the "W" logo, WE STAND FOR WILDLIFE, I STAND FOR WILDLIFE, and STAND FOR WILDLIFE are service marks of Wildlife Conservation Society.

2300 Southern Boulevard Bronx, New York 10460 (718) 220-5100