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Climate Change


Scientists discover the world’s largest nesting population of leatherback sea turtles on the beaches of Gabon. The finding offers new hope for the future of this endangered species.
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Wildlife Conservation Society applauds the launching of Coral Triangle Initiative at CTI Summit in Manado, Indonesia NEW YORK (MAY 15, 2009) On May 15, 2009, the Heads of State of Indonesia, the Philippines, Timor Leste, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Malaysia, signed a “leaders declaration” to officially launch the Coral Triangle Initiative on Coral Reefs, Fisheries and Food Security (CTI-CFF). As part of this historic initiative, the six countries pledge “accelerated and colla...
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Wildlife Conservation Society gives support to proving “Biotic Pump” model NEW YORK (May 1, 2009)—Climatologists have long assumed that vast rainforests are largely a regional consequence of heavy rain fall, but these ecosystems may actually be huge water pumps that generate most of their rain, says a Wildlife Conservation Society researcher in the most recent edition of BioScience Magazine. In fact, climate experts have largely ignored a recently published hypothesis on how rainforests influenc...
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In the face of warming ocean waters due to climate change, some coral reefs off East Africa are demonstrating unusual resiliency. A WCS study shows that successful fisheries management is key.
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Successful reef management coupled with geophysical factors produces hearty corals off East Africa coast NEW YORK (April 23, 2009) – The Wildlife Conservation Society announced today a study showing that some coral reefs off East Africa are unusually resilient to climate change due to improved fisheries management and a combination of geophysical factors. WCS announced the results of the study at the International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI), which is meeting this week in Phuket, Thailand. The ...
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Nearly 6,000 Irrawaddy dolphins are alive and swimming in Bangladesh, according to new WCS research. Prior to this study, the largest known populations of Irrawaddy dolphins numbered in the low hundreds or less.
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Nearly 6,000 Irrawaddy dolphins are alive and swimming in Bangladesh NEW YORK (April 1, 2009) -- The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today the discovery of a huge population of rare dolphins in South Asia—but warns that the population is threatened by climate change and fishing nets. Using rigorous scientific techniques, WCS researchers estimate that nearly 6,000 Irrawaddy dolphins, which are related to orcas or killer whales, were found living in freshwater regions of Bangladesh’...
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The Wildlife Conservation Society, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, and other groups say the health of coral reef fish is directly linked to local economies. Wealthy and least developed regions have the healthiest fish populations, while those in the middle are suffering.
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A combination of improved management and natural regeneration is helping corals stage a rapid comeback in Indonesia following the December 2004 tsunami.
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A WCS study suggests that the experience of matriarchs may help herds survive in the age of climate change, when animals may have to contend with increasing drought
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