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Madagascar & Western Indian Ocean

 

Rare climate refuge for coral reefs discovered off the coast of Kenya and Tanzania
A recent study has uncovered a small area off the coast of Kenya and Tanzania harboring a vast array of ocean life. 
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The World’s Rarest Corals are not Currently Being Protected Against Climate Change, Says New Study
Diversifying the world’s portfolio of protected coral reefs is critical to safeguarding biodiversity for our oceans, says a 27-year study of Kenyan corals out now in the Journal of the International Coral Reef Society. Scientists emphasize that rather than continuing to protect the most charismatic and well-recognized corals and habitats, we must “spread our risk” by protecting a more diverse mosaic of reef habitats. Conserving uncommon coral varieties by establishing protected...
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Scientists Discover Rare Bright Spot for Corals
A team of scientists have discovered that a large area in the Indo-Pacific known as the “Coral Triangle” is surprisingly resistant to thermal stress from climate change, making it a sanctuary for corals amid the ongoing climate crisis.
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New Study Finds Access to Education and Markets Vital for Coastal Fishing Communities Adapting to a Warming and Changing World
A new study investigating the links between coastal communities and coral reefs in Kenya and Madagascar has found that access to education and markets can help mitigate acute vulnerabilities for communities struggling with poverty and reliant on ecosystems degraded by overfishing.
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Good Governance Needed to Build Support for Fishing Restrictions
Good governance appears to be a prerequisite for local support of strong fisheries restrictions, the key finding in a recently published study of 16 fishing villages in East Africa that are struggling to achieve fisheries sustainability.
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East African Fish In Need of Recovery
A study of East African coral reefs has uncovered an unfolding calamity for the region: plummeting fish populations due to overfishing, which in turn could produce widespread food insecurity.
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Integrating Social and Ecological Science  For Effective Coral Reef Conservation
While many conservation plans focus on only environmental indicators for success, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)’s coral reef program is trying a relatively new approach: focusing on both social and ecological processes and outcomes to ensure a long-term future for coral reef systems, according to a newly published study.
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Besides Hot Water, Coral Bleaching Also About Location, Location, Location
As conservationists grapple with unprecedented levels of coral reef bleaching in the world’s warming oceans, scientists in the Indian and Pacific Oceans used the most recent El Nino of 2016 (the warmest year on record) to evaluate the role of excess heat as the leading driver of coral bleaching.
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A NEW HOPE FOR CORAL REEFS: Largest-Ever Study of Coral Communities Unlocks Global Solution to Save Reefs
he largest study ever conducted of its kind has identified where and how to save coral reef communities in the Indo-Pacific, according to an international group of scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other conservation NGOs, government agencies, and universities. The study outlines three viable strategies that can be quickly enacted to help save coral reefs that are threatened by climate change and human impacts.  
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Coral Reef Parks Protecting Only 40 Percent of Fish Biomass Potential
Marine scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other groups examining the ecological status of coral reefs across the Indian and Pacific oceans have uncovered an unsettling fact: even the best coral reef marine parks contain less than half of the fish biomass found in the most remote reefs that lie far from human settlements.
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